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NEWSLETTER

 

 

 

 


 


No. 78                 Quarterly Publication of EACES                    June 2016

 

 

Contents

Page

 

 

1.  MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

1

    

 

2. CALL FOR PAPERS

3

     2.1 Second World Congress of Comparative Economics

3

     2.2 Special EACES Session

5

     2.3 Economic Growth and Social Equity

5

 

 

3. ANNOUNCEMENTS  

6

     3.1 EACES 14th Biennial Conference

6

     3.2 EACES Award

9

     3.3 Visiting Scholars at the Institute for East and Southeast European Studies

10

     3.4 Message from ARCO

11

     3.5 Vacancy: Senior Lecturer (Academic) in Finance

 

11

 

 

4. RECENT PUBLICATIONS

13

     4.1 Recent Publications of EACES Members

13

     4.2 Journals’ Recent Publications

14

 

 

5. EACES OFFICIALS

21

 

 

EDITORIAL

25

 

 


1. MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

  


 


 


 

Expert Image

 

 


 

Dear Colleagues and friends,

 

I write to you more than a month after the very notion of supra-national institutional structures was brought into question by the UK referendum vote in favour of leaving the European Union. I thought it might be appropriate to reflect on this result and some of its implications in this newsletter. No doubt Brexit will be the source of many research projects and papers by our members in the future.

 

First, it is worth stressing that the vote seems very likely to result in UK exit around 2019. This is despite the fact that the debate was mendacious and mean spirited, especially on the Leave side. Moreover, it is not clear that such a complex and multi-dimensional issue was suitable for resolution by a plebiscite. But the political process has now moved on; with astonishing speed and ruthlessness the government has been replaced and creating a new economic system for the UK independent from Europe is now the main political agenda.

The possibility of Exit was present in the polls from the outset. In fact, in recognition of that, we organised an EACES workshop at LSE in February about Brexit, to coincide with the last EACES Board meeting. While we had some outstanding presentations and broad ranging discussions, perhaps the most memorable feature of the workshop was the unanimity amongst speakers and the audience that Brexit was a bad idea, and would unambiguously leave the UK ( and likely the EU also) worse off. Such a level of agreement amongst economists is rare; recall Ronald Reagan’s quip about the economists’ version of Trivial Pursuits with 1000 questions and 3000 answers. This raises the first interesting question; why did the voting public choose so spectacularly to ignore the unified advice from the economics profession. Several ideas have been put forward. One is that our standing was so low because of the damage caused by our failure to foresee the great recession from 2008 and our inability to identify policies to reverse it. A second views the issue in terms of income distribution; the better off and better educated, including the young and the urban elites, tended to support Remain. The supporters of Exit were disproportionately the poor, the socially excluded, the old and the rural. One might again point here to the failed promises of economists;  the burden from 2008 fell especially on these groups, which gave them little reason to believe predictions of further worsening post-Brexit. One might add that they felt they had less to lose. Then there is the issue of migration.  The EU represents, among many other things, an institution generating via its single market free trade and free labour movement within the Union. The consumer interest in free trade is clear, with greater scale and competition generating lower prices. However, the producer interest is not in favour of free labour movement, which results in reduced wages. Once again this impacts most in the areas of the labour market where the barriers to entry are lowest, for unskilled labour. Finally, the result is partly driven by demographic effects; unlike in the 1950s-70s where economic growth and dynamism was driven by a post-war baby boom, the UK is now an aging economy where the majority of voters are now middle aged or elderly. This demographic also favoured the Exit camp.

 

This discussion ignores the underlying politics that during the referendum campaign a new alliance was forged in the UK between traditional conservatives of the right who wished to reassert national independence and traditions, and a large proportion of the disaffected and older working class who, perhaps for the first time, deserted the Labour Party.  We have seen similar movements elsewhere in Europe, including in France, and there are worrying parallels with the rise of Donald Trump in the United States. For the moment however, in the UK this alliance collapsed as soon as it had won the referendum and a Conservative Party, cleansed of many of its Remain leaders, looks set for more years in power.

 

The referendum result is a significant blow against the tendency towards a convergent economic and political system within Europe. Indeed, as with the Trump campaign in the United States, much popular anger has been directed against the implications of the process of globalisation itself. Perhaps people failed to heed the almost unanimous advice of economists to remain because they wished to reassert national political sovereignty in the face of invisible global economic forces. Apart from migration, the vague notion of sovereignty was one of the keenest areas of debate, with the Leave campaigners promising to reassert UK control over UK policies. Aside from the feasibility of this, the implications for policy making have yet to be developed. The UK was already not in the Euro, and the authorities have allowed the pound to fall dramatically after the Leave vote. The UK has the ability to control both fiscal and monetary policy; in first weeks the Bank of England has decided not to lower rates but made clear that it was keeping its powder dry. Within days of the vote, the government signalled a major relaxation of fiscal policy by quietly shelving the plan to balance the budget within four years.

It is too early to do more than speculate about the longer term, but Brexit will likely have important consequences both for the EU and the UK. In terms of economic systems, the UK will probably revert towards the traditional Anglo-Saxon model with low taxes, flexible labour and product markets, strict competition rules and free trade globally. This means that some important elements of EU legislation adopted into the UK, notably concerning the social chapter and labour market functioning, may be reversed. The emphasis on big business, capital markets, entrepreneurship and innovation on the other hand will likely increase. This divergence may be paralleled on the EU side; with the British in favour of more liberal market policies absent, the EU might move further in the direction of greater unification and a social market economy.

 

While this may be a worse outcome for all sides than if the UK had stayed in the Union, it will certainly provide work in the years to come for comparative economists as they try to understand the impact of these different arrangements on national economic performance. I have no doubt that our Association will be in the forefront of these and many other studies.

 

As we now prepare to depart for our well earnt summer vacations, I end by reminding you all that in the early autumn we have our biannual conference in Regensburg, Germany. I hope to see you all there. At the General meeting of that Conference, your Association will elect a new President. It has been a pleasure as well as an honour to serve the Association in that role for the past two years.

 

 

 

 

Saul Estrin

London School of Economics

 

 

 

 


 

 

 


 

2. CALL FOR PAPERS

 

2.1 Second World Congress of Comparative Economics

 

 

1917–2017: From Revolution to Evolution

01-03 June, 2017

St. Petersburg, Russian Federation

 

Call for papers

 


The European Association for Comparative Economic Studies (EACES), The Association for Comparative Economic Studies (ACES), The Japanese Association for Comparative Economic Studies (JACES) and The Korean Association for Comparative Economic Studies (KACES)

in collaboration with the Italian Association for Comparative Economic Studies (AISSEC), The Society for the Study of Emerging Markets (SSEM), The Chinese Economists Society (CES), The European Association for Evolutionary Political Economy (EAEPE)  and other scientific associations and networks are issuing a call for papers for the panel sessions and individual papers for the Second World Congress of Comparative Economics in St. Petersburg on June 01-03, 2017.


Sessions (parallels and plenaries) and round tables of the Congress will be devoted to a broad spectrum of theoretical and empirical contributions on the following topics:


 ·         institutional design and institutional dynamics

 

 ·         catching up, cyclical development and structural transformation

 

 ·         macroeconomic stability and macroeconomic policies

 

 ·         development of financial and banking sector

 

 ·         labour market and industrial relations

 

 ·         human capital development

 

 ·         industrial organization

 

 ·         issues of regional development

 

 ·         international trade and trade policy

 

 ·         migration and foreign direct investment

 

 ·         issues of international economic integration, and

                                      

 ·         economic history.

 

The above list is not exhaustive and all submissions broadly related to the topic of socio-economic development and policy will be considered.



We invite submissions of panel sessions (3 or 4 abstracts/papers) or individual abstracts/papers.

Scientific Committee (in alphabetic order, to be completed):


Michael Alexeev (ACES), Wladimir Andreff (EACES), Svetlana Avdasheva (HSE University), Josef C. Brada (ACES), Fabio Clementi (AISSEC), Olga Demidova (EACES), Saul Estrin (EACES), Francesco Farina (AISSEC), Jens Holscher (EACES), Ichiro Iwasaki (JACES), Jürgen Jerger (EACES), Sergei Kadochnikov (HSE University in St.Petersburg), Michael Keren (EACES), Byung Yeon Kim (KACES), Si Joong Kim (KACES), Evzen Kocenda (ACES), Ali Kutan (SSEM), Masaaki Kuboniwa (JACES), Kazuhiro Kumo (JACES), Siong Hook Law (SSEM), Eduard Limonov (HSE University in St. Petersburg), Maria Lissowska (EAEPE), Jun Ma (CES), Satoshi Mizobata (JACES), Alexander Muravyev (HSE University in St. Petersburg), Jinlan Ni (CES), Stephan Panther (EAEPE), Scott D. Rozelle (ACES), Magdolna Sass (EACES), Marcello Signorelli (EACES), Sergey Slobodyan (HSE University in St. Petersburg), Wonyong Sung (KACES), Pasquale Tridico (EAEPE), Milica Uvalic (EACES), Vittorio Valli (EACES), Paul Wachtel (ACES), Andrey Yakovlev (EACES), Ol
 eg Zamulin (HSE University), Dayong Zhang (SSEM).


Programme Committee:

Josef C. Brada (ACES), Saul Estrin (EACES), Sergei Kadochnikov (HSE University in St.Petersburg), Byung Yeon Kim (KACES), Masaaki Kuboniwa (JACES), Marcello Signorelli (EACES) and Andrey Yakovlev (EACES)


Local Organising Committee:

Anna Fedyunina (HSE University in St. Petersburg), Sergei Kadochnikov (HSE University in St. Petersburg), Eduard Limonov (HSE University in St. Petersburg), Tatiana Meshkova (HSE University in St. Petersburg), Elena Rogova (HSE University in St. Petersburg), Marcello Signorelli (EACES), Sergey Slobodyan (HSE University in St. Petersburg) and Andrey Yakovlev (EACES)

Submission details:


Details on submission procedure, selection process, registration and payment will be included in the second Call for Papers that will be circulated by August 2016.


Submissions will be open from September 1, 2016 to January 15, 2017


Information about acceptance/rejection by February 15, 2017


For additional information, please contact:

 

1) Mrs. Anna Fedyunina: afedyunina@hse.ru

2) Proff. Enrico Marelli and Marcello Signorelli: marcello.signorelli@unipg.it

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.2 Special EACES Session

 

 

Special EACES session (within SIE Congress, 20-22 October, 2016, Milan, Italy) on the topic “Quo Vadis Europe? Economic policies and institutional reforms”.


Call for Papers

 

Submissions to be made directly in “conference maker” (Società Italiana degli Economisti) by selecting the above session (with EACES).

See also the complete Call for Papers at the following link to SIE webpage: http://www.siecon.org/online/convegni/57ma-rsa-milano/


2.3 Economic Growth and Social Equity

 

Economic Growth and Social Equity

Conference on Nicholas Kaldor’s legacy in the 21st century

 

Organised by: Department of Economic Policy

(Corvinus University of Budapest)

In cooperation with Friedrich Ebert Stiftung (Budapest)

and the Corvinus University Alumni Society

 

Lord Kaldor, Cambridge economist died 30 years ago. He was born in Budapest, studied at the LSE, worked for the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, and advised the Labour government of Harold Wilson on taxation and economic policy. His legacy offers opportunities to analyse contemporary economic and social questions. Issues like the recent financial and economic crisis, secular stagnation, eurozone economics and income inequality will be discussed in the context of economic growth and social equity.

 

Date: 30 September 2016 (Friday)

Venue: Corvinus University of Budapest, Auditorium III

(1093 Budapest, Fővám tér 8.)

Coordinator: László Andor

 

Programme:

Morning: keynote speeches by Mary Kaldor (LSE), Frances Stewart (Univ. of Oxford), Anthony Thirlwall (Univ. of Kent), Robert Skidelsky (Univ. of Warwick), James K. Galbraith (Univ. of Texas, Austin)

 

Afternoon: workshops on “Keynes, Kaldor and their legacy” (chair: Sebastian Dullien, Univ. of Applied Sciences, Berlin); „Growth models and policies” (chair: Grzegorz W. Kolodko, Kozminski Univ., Warsaw); „Taxation and inequality” (chair: Kitty Stewart, LSE)

 

Closing round table on “The economics of the European Union” with

 Peter Bofinger (Univ. of Würzburg), Júlia Király (CUB), George Pagoulatos (Athens Univ. of Economics and Business), Michael Landesmann (Johannes Kepler Univ., Linz); chair: Paul Adamson (Forum Europe, Brussels)

 

For registration and more information please visit the conference website at kaldor.uni-corvinus.hu.


 

3. ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

3.1 EACES 14th Biennial Conference in 8-10 September at Institute for East and South-east European Studies (IOS), University of Regensburg, Germany

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.2 EACES Award

 

 

 

 

Dr Thomas Lambert

Rotterdam School of Management

Erasmus University

Rotterdam

 

t.lambert@rsm.nl

 

Dear Dr Lambert,

EACES Dissertation Award, 2016

We are honoured and very glad to inform you that the jury appointed by the European Association for Comparative Economics has unanimously agreed that your dissertation, "Essays on the Political Economy of Finance", should be awarded the Dissertation Award for 2016. You will receive the prize of 1000 Euros at the 16th Bi-annual Congress of the Association in Regensburg, to be held between September 8th and 10th, this year. In addition your conference fee will be waved.

 

We are looking forward to hear the presentation of your to the plenary session of the 13th EACES conference. The preliminary programme has scheduled your lecture in the afternoon on the first day of the conference, but the exact time will be determined by the organisers.

 

With congratulations and our best wishes for a successful career,

 

 

 

Randolph Bruno                     Saul Estrin       Michael Keren             Tomasz Micikiewicz

 

 

 

3.3 Visiting Scholars at the Institute for East and Southeast European Studies

 

 

 

 

Institution: Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (IOS) Regensburg

Application deadline: August 31, 2016

 

Program for visiting scholars at the Institute for East and Southeast European Studies

(IOS) in Regensburg (2017)

 

The Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (www.ios-regensburg.de) in Regensburg is an independent research facility with close links to the University of Regensburg. It conducts interdisciplinary research in the historical, economic and political developments of Eastern and Southeastern Europe. Another significant feature is the institute’s distinctly international orientation.

 

The IOS carries out research in four major areas:

 

·         Governance Between Personalization and Formalization

·         Dynamics of Exchange

·         Forms and Relations of Work in Change

·         Frozen and Unfrozen Conflicts

 

Furthermore the IOS maintains a special library holding a stock of more than 320,000 media units of literature in humanities and social sciences relating to the countries of Eastern and Southeastern Europe.

 

Within the framework of its Visiting Research Fellow Program, the IOS encourages applications from historians, economists and political scientists as well as scholars of cognate disciplines. The duration of the research stay usually lasts between two and four weeks. The fellows are expected to conduct research relevant to the research profile of the institute. The allowance is determined by the duration of the stay and the applicant’s professional experience.

 

Together with the University of Regensburg, the institute provides an attractive research environment in a city known for its high quality of life. Regensburg has one of Germany’s largest preserved medieval cities holding the status of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

 

For our 2017 Visiting Researcher Program please submit your application online via the IOS application portal until August 31, 2016 at http://www.ios-regensburg.de/en/visiting-fellows- program.html.

 

The application documents should include the following:

 

    a short research proposal in German or English (maximum three pages)

    a detailed academic Curriculum Vitae naming two references

    copies of no more than three academic articles (published or unpublished)

    preferences concerning length and desired period of your stay

 

 

3.4 Message from ARCO

 

Dear Sir/Madam,

ARCO (Action Research for CO-development) is pleased to invite you to the 2nd Edition of the Summer School on Impact Evaluation Methodologies held by Donald B. Rubin (Harvard University), Fabrizia Mealli (University of Florence) and Ilf Bencheikh (J-PAL Europe).


This year it will be possible to choose between two optional curricula:

• Global Development Economics and Policy

• Public Health and Epidemiology

The Summer School will take place in Florence (Italy) from the 12th to the 15th of September 2016.

For further information see: 
http://www.arcolab.org/projects/program/

Prof. Andrea Ferrannini     andrea.ferrannini@arcolab.org;

 

 

3.5 Vacancy: Senior Lecturer (Academic) in Finance

 

Key information

Salary: Starting salary from £38,896 - £46,414 per annum with further progression opportunities to £50,702

Date advertised: Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Closing date: Thursday, August 18, 2016 - midnight

Please quote reference: FMG67

Bournemouth University is creating the most stimulating, challenging and rewarding university experience in a world-class learning community by sharing our unique fusion of excellent education, research and professional practice and inspiring our students, graduates and staff to enrich the world.

Within the newly formed Faculty of Management the Department of Accounting, Finance & Economics is a long established group of academic and professionally qualified staff. It delivers its programmes (including accounting, finance, risk management, economics and corporate governance) to a high standard, both undergraduate and postgraduate, and is active not only in the research world but also with its allied professional bodies. Its innovative approach resulted in the UK’s first degrees in financial services and in taxation and its focus on current issues and professional body accreditation results in excellent graduate employment statistics.

As Senior Lecturer in Finance, you will be able to demonstrate leadership in the area of Finance. Enthusiastic about student-centred pedagogy, you will contribute to education delivery, including programme management as required, across the range of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes. You will also make a significant contribution to employability, and professional engagement with relevant internal and external organisations, at a regional, national and international level.

You will be qualified to Doctorate level or be able to demonstrate the ability to create and disseminate knowledge at an equivalent level and the capability to convert this knowledge into a doctorate in a maximum of 3-5 years from the date of appointment. You will be research active and committed to a culture of academic excellence and continuous improvement. The department has a vibrant PhD student community and has a strong group of enthusiastic early career researchers.

Applications are welcome from those with particular expertise in the areas of financial regulation, financial institutions and finance in general. 

For further information and discussion or the opportunity for an informal visit, please contact Professor Jens Hölscher by phone on 01202 965392 or via email jholscher@bournemouth.ac.uk.

 


 

4. PUBLICATIONS

 

4.1 Publications of EACES Members

 

Recent Publications of Wladimir Andreff

 

Outward Foreign Direct Investment from BRIC countries: Comparing strategies of Brazilian, Russian, Indian and Chinese multinational companies, European Journal of Comparative Economics, 12 (2), 2016, 79-131.


Maturing Strategies of Russian Multinational Companies: Comparisons with Chinese Multinationals, in D.A. Dyker, ed., World Scientific Reference on Globalisation in Eurasiaand the Pacific Rim, Vol. 1: Foreign investment, World Scientific and Imperial College Press, London 2015, pp. 77-120.


An attempt at disequilibrium modelling a team sportsleague, in W. Andreff, ed., Disequilibrium Sports Economics: Competitive Imbalance and Budget Constraints, Edward Elgar, Cheltenham 2015, 11-49.


Governance of professional team sports clubs: agency problem and soft budget constaint, in W. Andreff, ed., Disequilibrium Sports Economics: Competitive Imbalance and Budget Constraints, Edward Elgar, Cheltenham 2015, 175-227.


Economic prediction of sport performances from the Beijing Olympics to the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa: the notion of surprising sporting outcomes, in P. Rodriguez, S. Késenne & R. Koning,eds., The Economics of Competitive Sports, Edward Elgar, Cheltenham 2015, pp. 185-215.

 

Recent Publications of Prof. Yoji Koyama

Yoji Koyama (2015), The EU’s Eastward Enlargement: Central and Eastern Europe’s Strategies for Development, Singapore: World Scientific
http://www.worldscientific.com/worldscibooks/10.1142/9152

Yoji Koyama (ed.) (2016), The Eurozone Enlargement: Prospect of New EU Member States for Europe Adoption, New York; Nova Sciences https://www.novapublishers.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=56865


Recent Publications of Prof. Pasquale Tridico

“Varieties of Economic Inequality” Eds. S. Fadda and P. Tridico, Routledge 2016.
https://www.routledge.com/products/9781138928015

 


 

4.2 Journals’ Recent Publications

 

 

ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/621171/description

 

 

Economic Systems on ScienceDirect(Opens new window)

Vol. 40 (2) 2016

 

Contents:

 

Introduction: Openness, institutions, and long-run socio-economic development

Pages 195-197,

Josef C. Brada, Richard Frensch, Erich Gundlach

 

How did trade norms evolve in Scandinavia? Long-distance trade and social trust in the Viking age

Pages 198-205,

Gunnar Lind Haase Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard Svendsen

 

Accumulated social capital, institutional quality, and economic performance: Evidence from China

Pages 206-219,

Zhiqiang Dong, Yongjing Zhang

 

Fuelling political fiscal cycles by opportunistic privatization in transition economies: The case of Albania

Pages 220-231,

Endrit Lami, Drini Imami, Holger Kächelein

 

Does government ideology influence environmental performance? Evidence based on a new dataset

Pages 232-246,

Jun Wen, Yu Hao, Gen-Fu Feng, Chun-Ping Chang

 

Shutdown versus M&A: An empirical investigation of Slovenian incumbent firms’ responses to foreign competition

Pages 247-259,

Katja Zajc Kejžar

 

Understanding the link between aid and corruption: A causality analysis

Pages 260-272,

Audrey-Rose Menard, Laurent Weill

 

The link between trade openness, export diversification, institutions and output volatility in transition countries

Pages 273-287,

Merima Balavac, Geoff Pugh

 

Regulation, trade and economic growth

Pages 308-322,

Magdalene Silberberger, Jens Königer

 

Testing financial markets convergence in Central and Eastern Europe: A non-linear single factor model

Pages 323-334,

Mihai Niţoi, Maria Miruna Pochea

 

 

 

 

Post Communist Economies

Web page:  http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cpce20/current

 

Volume 28, Issue 2, 2016

 

Contents:

 

GDP growth in Russia: different capital stock series and the terms of trade

Pages 129-145,

Ville Kaitila

 

From goulash communism to goulash populism: the unwanted legacy of Hungarian reform socialism

Pages 146-166,

István Benczes

 

 

The Ukraine conflict, economic–military power balances and economic sanctions

Pages 167-198,

Christopher Mark Davis

 

 

The All-Russian National Front – for Russia: a new actor in the political and economic landscape

Pages 199-219,

Silvana Malle

 

Creative destruction on the Chechen frontier?

Pages 220-231,

Gregory Brock

 

Sovereign default risk and state-owned bank fragility in emerging markets: evidence from China and Russia

Pages 232-248,

Oleg Deev & Martin Hodula

 

 

Incorporating household production into the National Transfer Accounts for Slovenia

Pages 249-267,

Jože Sambt, Gretchen Donehower & Miroslav Verbič

 

Are the kinship networks a resource or a curse for small firms in post-communist countries? The case of Albania

Pages 268-279,

Esmeralda Gassie-Falzone

 

 

Comparative Economic Studies

 

Web page: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/ces/index.html

 

http://www.palgrave-journals.com/pal/images/journal-covers/ces.gif

Volume 58, Issue 2, 2016

 

Contents:

Top of page

Introduction: Recent Monetary and Financial Developments in Europe

Pages 147-151,

Alberto Bagnai, Camélia Turcu

 

Symposium Article: Current Accounts in the European Union and the Sectoral Influence: An Empirical Assessment

Pages 152-173,

Agnieszka Gehringer

 

Symposium Article: Does Bank Performance Contribute to Economic Growth in the European Union?

Pages 174-195,

Cândida Ferreira

 

Symposium Article: Structural and Cyclical Determinants of Bank Interest-Rate Pass-Through in the Eurozone

Pages 196-225,

Aurélien Leroy, Yannick Lucotte

 

Symposium Article: Fiscal Forecasts and Slippages: The Role of the SGP and Domestic Fiscal Frameworks

Pages 226-253,

Patrícia Martins, Leonida Correia

 

Labor-Market Volatility and Financial Development in the Advanced OECD Countries: Does Labor-Market Regulation Matter?

Pages 254-278,

Thibault Darcillon

 

Foreign Aid Fiscal Policy: Theory and Evidence

Pages 279-314,

Simplice Asongu, Mohamed Jellal,

 

 

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH

 

Web page: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/ejdr/index.html

 

http://www.palgrave-journals.com/pal/images/journal-covers/ejdr.jpg

Volume 28, Issue 3, 2016

Contents:

 

original articles

 

South–South Trade in Capital Goods – The Market-Driven Diffusion of Appropriate Technology

Pages 361-378,

Rebecca Hanlin, Raphael Kaplinsky

 

Tilling the Soil in Tanzania: What do Emerging Economies have to Offer?

Pages 379-396,

Andrew Agyei-Holmes

 

Chinese Technologies and Pro-Poor Industrialisation in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of Furniture Manufacturing in Kenya

Pages 397-413,

Richmond Atta-Ankomah

 

Brazil’s Tropical Solutions for Africa: Tractors, Matracas and the Politics of ‘Appropriate Technology’

Pages 414-430,

Lídia Cabral

 

Decomposing Inequality of Opportunity in Immunization by Circumstances: Evidence from India

Pages 431-446,

Rama Pal

 

Realigning the Political and the Technical: NGOs and the Politicization of Agrarian Development in Bolivia

Pages 447-464,

Diana Cordoba, Kees Jansen

 

What Happens When Corporate Ownership Shifts to China? A Case Study on Rubber Production in Cameroon

Pages 465-478,

S Assembe-Mvondo, P O Cerutti, L Putze

 

Understanding NGO Strategies to Engage with Donor-Funded Development Projects: Reconciling and Differentiating Objectives

Pages 479-494,

Markus Ketola

 

Intergenerational Persistence of Industry in India

Pages 495-511,

Tushar K Nandi

Top of page

Book review

 

Le dictionnaire du développement durable

Pages 512-513,

Philippe Hugon

 

Global Poverty: Global Governance and Poor People in the Post-2015 Era

Pages 513-515,

Fethiye B Ceylan

 

Labour Markets, Institutions and Inequality: Building Just Societies in the 21st Century

Pages 515-519,

Christian Dreger

 

 

 

 

 

 

ECONOMIC ANNALS

Web page: http://ea.ekof.bg.ac.rs/

 

 

Volume LXI, no. 209, 2016

 

Contents:

 

On Asymmetric Causal Relationships In Petropolitics
Pages: 7-26,

Feyza Balan



Exchange Rate Regimes And External Financial Stability
Pages: 27-44,

Ovidiu Stoica, Iulian Ihnatov

Privatization In Serbia – An Assesment Before The Last Round
Pages: 45-78,

Ivan Vujačić, Jelica Petrović Vujačić

The Post-Acquisition Performance Of Acquired Companies: Evidence From The Rebulic Of Serbia
Pages: 79-104,

Slađana Savović

Multichannel Strategy – The Dominant Approach In Modern Retailing
Pages: 105-128,

Dragan Stojković, Stipe Lovreta, Zoran Bogetić

Price Discrimination, Entry, And Switching Costs In Network Competition
Pages: 129-160,

Dejan Trifunović, Đorđe Mitrović

The Foreign Exchange Transaction Exposure Of Enterprises In Serbia
Pages: 161-178,

Jasmina Bogićević, Ljiljana Dmitrović Šaponja, Marija Pantelić

 


6. EACES OFFICIALS

 

 

 

 

Managing Board

 

Expert Image

http://econ.core.hu/file/image/d1e12_SassM.JPG

         Saul Estrin

           President

 

Department of Management

LSE

Houghton St

             London WC2A 2AE

Tel: +44-20 7955 6605

E-mail: s.estrin@lse.ac.uk

Website:http://www2.lse.ac.uk/researchAndExpertise/Experts/s.estrin@lse.ac.uk

Magdolna Sass

Vice-president

 

Institute for Economics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

1112 Budaörsiút. 45
E-mail:
sass.magdolna@krtk.mta.hu

Phone: (+36-1) 309-2652
Fax: (+36-1) 319-3136

      Website: http://econ.core.hu/english/inst/sass.html

 

Randolph Bruno

Secretary

 

School of Arts & Social Sciences

University College London

16 Taviton Street

London

WC1H 0BW, UK

Tel: +44(0)20 7679 8757

E-mail: randolph.bruno@ucl.ac.uk

Website:http://www.iza.org/en/webcontent/personnel/photos/index_html?key=3235

Jens Hölscher

Treasurer

 

Head of Department

Accounting, Finance & Economics

The Business School, Bournemouth University

Executive Business Centre

89 Holdenhurst Road, Bournemouth BH8 8EB, UK

E-mail: jholscher@bournemouth.ac.uk

Website:http://staffprofiles.bournemouth.ac.uk/display/jholscher

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Members of the Executive Committee

(Alphabetical order by family name)

 

http://wiwi-app.uni-regensburg.de/evaluation/data/upload/picture_jej14984_823fdc592f5086e80bf8204a97a26f5f.jpg

Roman Horvath

EC Member

 

Institute of Economic Studies

Charles University, Prague

Ovocný trh 3-5, 116 36 Praha 1

Czech Republic

Tel: +420- 222 112 317     

Fax: (+49) 3731/39 27 33

E-mail: roman.horvath@fsv.cuni.cz

Website: http://ies.fsv.cuni.cz/en/staff/horvath

JuergenJerger

EC Member

 

 

University of Regensburg and IOS Regensburg,

nachVereinbarungmitdem

E-mail:jerger@ios-regensburg.de

Tele: +49-941 943 2697

Fax:+49-941 943-4941

Website: www.wiwi.uni-r.de/jerger

 

Satoshi Mizobata

EC Member

 

Institute of Economic Research,

Kyoto University

Yoshidahon-machi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto,

Japan 6068501

Tel: +81-75-753-7144

E-mail: mizobata@kier.kyoto-u.ac.jp

Website:http://www.kier.kyoto-u.ac.jp/faculty-e.html#hikaku

Martin Myant

EC Member

 

European Trade Union Institute

Bd du Roi Albert II, 5

1210 Brussels

Belgium
e-mail:MMyant@etui.org
Website:http://www.etui.org/About-Etui/Staff/Martin-  Myant

 

Jan Svejnar

EC Member

School of International and Public Affairs

Columbia University

420 W. 118th Street

New York, NY 10027

USA

E-mail: js4085@columbia.edu

Website: https://sipa.columbia.edu/faculty/jan-svejnar

Milica Uvalic

EC Member

Department of Economics, Finance and Statistics

Via Pascoli 20

University of Perugia, 06123 Perugia, Italy

Tel: +39-075-5855292, 5855279

Fax: +39-075-5855299

E-mail: milica.uvalic@unipg.it

Website: http://www.ec.unipg.it/DEFS/uvalic.html

UrmasVarblane

EC Member

University of Tartu

Institute of Economics

Narva 4, 51009 Tartu

Estonia

Tel: +372-737-6361   Fax: +372-737-6327

E-mail: varblane@mtk.ut.ee

Website:https://www.etis.ee/portaal/isikuCV.aspx?TextBoxName=urmas+varblane&PersonVID=3198&FromUrl0=isikud.aspx&lang=en

Ivan Vujacic

EC Member

Department of Economics and Statistics

University of Beograd

Kamenicka 6, Belgrade 11000, Serbia

Tel: +381-11-3021094

E-mail:  ivujacic@ekof.bg.ac.rs Website:http://www.researchgate.net/institution/University_of_Belgrade/department/Department_of_Economics_and_Statistics

Andrei Yakovlev

EC Member

University - Higher School of Economics

Institute for Industrial and Market Studies

Slavyanskayapl 4, bldg 2,

Moscow 109074, Russia    

Tel.: +7-495-6288649

E-mail ayakovlev@hse.ruand y_andrei@mail.ru

Website: http://www.hse.ru/org/persons/305238/

 

Members of the Advisory Board 

 

 

 

 

Wladimir Andreff

University of Paris 1-Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne

Andreff@univ-paris1.fr

Will Bartlett

London School of Economics and Political Science

w.j.bartlett@lse.ac.uk

Laszlo Csaba

Central European University, Budapest

Csabal@ceu.hu

Bruno Dallago

Università di Trento, Department of Economics

Bruno.dallago@economia.unitn.it

Daniel Daianu

The Academy of Economic Studies, Bucharest

daiandan@b.astral.ro

Jens Hölscher

Bournemouth University, England

jholscher@bournemouth.ac.uk

Mario Nuti

London Business School

mnuti@london.edu

Marcello Signorelli

Department of Economics, University of Perugia

marcello.signorelli@unipg.it

Milica Uvalic

Department of Economics, University of Perugia

milica.uvalic@unipg.it

Vittorio Valli

Università di Torino, Dept. Economia

vittorio.valli@unito.it

Hans-Jürgen Wagener

Europa Universitaet Viadrina, Frankfurt/Oder

mail@hjwagener.de

Tomasz  Mickiewicz

Aston University

mickiewt@aston.ac.uk

 

Honorary Members:

 

Ronald Dore

Gregory Grossman

Michael Kaser

János Kornai

Marie Lavigne

Angus Maddison0301

Domenico Mario Nuti

Wladimir Andreff

 

Ex – Officio Member

Michael Keren

Michael.Keren@huji.ac.il

Hebrew University

Department of Economics

Naphtali Bldg. Scopus Campus, 91905 Jerusalem (Israel)

Tel: +972-26528521; Fax: 972-2-5816071


Editorial:

 

The presidential message in this 78th issue of EACES quarterly newsletter presents the potential dimensions of the post-Brexit scenario in the wake of the EU Leave outcome of the referendum. It will create a new economic system for the UK independent from Europe in the years to come. Damage caused by our failure to foresee the great recession from 2008 and our inability to identify policies to reverse it might have triggered towards this outcome because the supporters of Exit were disproportionately the poor, the socially excluded, the old and the rural. The burden from 2008 fell especially on these groups. Then there is the issue of migration.  The EU represents, among many other things, an institution generating via its single market free trade and free labour movement within the Union. The consumer interest in free trade is clear; however, the producer interest is not in favour of free labour movement. Finally, the result is partly driven by demographic effects; unlike in the 1950s-70s where economic growth and dynamism was driven by a post-war baby boom, the UK is now an aging economy where the majority of voters are now middle aged or elderly. This demographic also favoured the Exit camp.

 

The referendum result is a significant blow against the tendency towards a convergent economic and political system within Europe. Much popular anger has been directed against the implications of the process of globalisation itself. The UK will probably revert towards the traditional Anglo-Saxon model with low taxes, flexible labour and product markets, strict competition rules and free trade globally. This means that some important elements of EU legislation adopted into the UK, notably concerning the social chapter and labour market functioning, may be reversed. The emphasis on big business, capital markets, entrepreneurship and innovation on the other hand will likely increase. This divergence may be paralleled on the EU side; with the British in favour of more liberal market policies absent, the EU might move further in the direction of greater unification and a social market economy.

 

Section 2 of this newsletter presents call for papers to the Second World Congress of Comparative Economics in will be held in St. Petersburg on June 01-03, 2017. The European Association for Comparative Economic Studies (EACES), The Association for Comparative Economic Studies (ACES), The Japanese Association for Comparative Economic Studies (JACES) and The Korean Association for Comparative Economic Studies (KACES) are issuing a call for papers for the panel sessions and individual reports for the conference. Further updates will appear in the next newsletter. This section also presents the call for papers to Special EACES Session to be held during 20-22 October 2016 in Milan, Italy, and conference on Economic Growth and Social Equity to be held in Corvinus University of Budapest on 30th September 2016.

 

Basic information regarding the forthcoming EACES biennial conference in Regensburg, Germany, is the subject matter of Section 3. This three-day conference will focus on Comparative Economic Development in the Long Run. This section of the newsletter presents the preliminary outline of the conference. Information regarding the hotel/accommodations in Regensburg, and other useful information about the city are also inclusive in the section.

 

Section 4 enlists the recent publications of EACES members: Wladimir Andreff, Yoji Koyama, and Pasquale Tridico. Furthermore, this section also informs recent publications of some journals associated with comparative economic studies, more specifically that of Economic Systems, Post-communist Economies, Comparative Economic Studies, European Journal of Development Research, and Economic Annals.

 

We welcome any comment/suggestion for the improvement of the newsletter. The submissions are requested to deliver in the form of hard copy or (preferably) electronic copy as a Microsoft Word file to the editor:

 

 

Sanjaya Acharya

E-mail: sanjaya.acharya@gmail.com

Pole tekstowe: EJCE (The European Journal of Comparative Economics) E-Journal and 
ECONOMIC SYSTEMS (A Quarterly Journal published by the Osteuropa-InstitutMünchen/Elsevier in collaboration with EACES) are the journals associated with EACES.
For details, please follow the link: http://www.eaces.net/public.html.
              June 2016